A Post Featuring Both European Borders AND Boundary Stones: Be Still Our Hearts

As anyone who follows this blog knows, we’re weirdly enthralled with all things cartographic in Europe. Plus, we have a comparable passion for Old Town Alexandria – the undisputed best small town in America – which includes our fair city’s retrocession from the District of Columbia in the 19th century. A local cartographic legacy that is still represented by extant boundary stones in Virginia delineating the original borders of the District.

Imagine our nerdy elation upon reading a news article in today’s New York Times that involves both!

Regarding boundary stones, recall this image from our Alexandria, DC, post celebrating the anniversary of our fair city’s retrocession:

Boundary stone Southwest 2 near Alexandria’s Union Station

Now, compare that image with this one of the 1819 boundary stone on the Franco-Belgian border from this morning’s article:

A stone, carved with the year 1819, marks the border between France and Belgium. It was recently moved by a farmer, local officials said.
From https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/05/world/europe/france-belgium-border-moved.html

You can read the full New York Times article here, but the essence is captured by this paragraph:

“Apparently frustrated by a 200-year-old stone border marker, a Belgian farmer dug it out and moved it about seven feet into French territory, local officials told French news media, thus slightly enlarging his own land as well as the entire country of Belgium.”

Nice!

Categories: Belgium, France, Maps and Miscellany, Miscellany | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “A Post Featuring Both European Borders AND Boundary Stones: Be Still Our Hearts

  1. Catherine Poulin

    Haven’t we all dreamed of doing this?

    Like

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